Caring for the Elderly

Dementia

I am really excited to say I have completed the Understanding Dementia program and the Preventing Dementia Program.  I highly recommend these courses for anyone who works with people who have dementia or who have a loved one with dementia.

Phone/Text  027 978 5970


Life Coaching"
"Success Coaching"
"Motivation to Succeed Coach


"MOTV8N to Succeed"
Email - kim.motv8ncoach@ihug.co.nz
Skype - kim.motv8n


Dementia

I have been doing some research on Dementia and have found some amazing resources out there.
I have worked in rest homes, dementia units and hospital care for several years. The part I always found hard was watching the family try and cope with the changes of their loved ones.  This can be particularly hard, when Dementia is in its final stages and sometimes people dont recognise their own families.  There is a real journey that goes on for everyone involved.

Over the coming months, I would like to share some of the resources with you.
The first one I would like to share even offer free courses about Dementia, so if you are a caregiver or just wanting to find out more, this organisation is amazing.

https://www.facebook.com/UnderstandingDementia

Take Care

Kim and Team

Phone/Text  027 978 5970


Life Coaching"
"Success Coaching"
"Motivation to Succeed Coach


"MOTV8N to Succeed"
Email - kim.motv8ncoach@ihug.co.nz
Skype - kim.motv8n


Elderly Care


One of the things for sure in life, is the life cycle.  All those who are born will one day die. What lies in between those stages has a massive variance across the human race.

When dealing with elderly people, my belief is a great deal of respect is needed. Those who have gone before us have often helped to pave the way for a better society for us.  Some caught up in Wars and major changes along their life cycle.

The older person will often have great stories to tell about their lives. After all, even at 60 years of age, what massive changes would that person have seen in their life time.

As part of one of my life goals, I spent several years working in rest homes. Although the elderly bodies and minds might grow weaker, they still have many stories to tell.  Their life experience is vast, and generally given the time to talk, they will love to tell you about parts of their life.  These times are precious, and it seems so sad for life long stories to go untold.

As people age, we need to make sure as a society that their basic needs are met, especially when they become more vulnerable and maybe lonely.  As a caring person, we can check that those elders around us are safe, warm, feed, have access to good medical care, and aren't lonely.

Illnesses or aches and pains can set in, the older person can sometimes drop out of society, and become a prisoner in their own home.  Their lack of mobility may also keep them staying at home.

In NZ, there are many organisations that will help out, first stop for advice generally being the doctor. Sometimes an older person may need an advocate to speak for them.

Our elderly are precious, their stories can often go untold, their contribution to society often unseen as we see the person who is in the rest home needing help.

The elderly were young once too, and it is a cycle that will come to many of us.

Embrace our elderly and enjoy the time we have with them, as one day for sure it will be us wanting the same respect.

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